Are we becoming more disconnected by Technology

Katos

They see me breakin’
May 2, 2020
creatorswave.com
Hi Forumers,

These days, it's incredibly easy to pick up a phone, tablet or laptop and do everything from your weekly shop, to ordering a takeout or video chatting your friend who lives on the other side of the world (shoutout to resident other-sider @s3_gunzel).

With this connectivity, are we becoming more distanced to those closest to us, and relying too heavily on technology to plug the gaps?
What are your thoughts on this?
 

ARx182

Active Member
Apr 30, 2020
Like you said, we wouldn't be able to communicate with people on the other side of the world if it wasn't for technology but technology is addictive and once you start overusing (I'm guilty of this myself), you start ignoring those around you. In my opinion, there has to be a balance. Personally I know when to put my phone down. It takes a great deal of self control but it's for the greater good.
 

Pandemix

MD developer
Apr 20, 2020
marketersdelight.com
This has been a battle in my own life, as I'm sure many can relate, and I think the more useful examination to make is how technology has affected the quality of your life. Being connected to technology has been a net positive for humanity for the sheer amount of knowledge that is now available to us all now, even if the drawbacks are we haven't figured out how to always use it in the best way.

And that's where personal accountability comes in—how connected do you want to be and are you still on track towards becoming the person you want to be or are you giving a large portion of your energy to controlling something that has slowly taken control over you?

I faced this personally and the answer for me was to get rid of my smartphone in 2018 and use a "dump" flip phone and I believe this was one of the best decisions I ever made for myself. It took a long time to come to that conclusion and even longer to take action, and a big reason I think I can do it is because I work in front of the computer fulltime anyway, so I get everything I need there and feel far more focused and present in the world without a high powered device microwaving the inside of my pocket.

With this connectivity, are we becoming more distanced to those closest to us, and relying too heavily on technology to plug the gaps?
From my own switch I realized that if you let your brain control what you do on your smartphone then it is easy to distance yourself from others. Why call your mom when you can just browse Twitter? Does answering texts from friends seem so important when you have dozens of unread emails next to it? When does work really end if your work apps come home with you? Eliminating these possibilites has made it way simpler for me, but it's not an extreme everyone needs to go to.
 
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Katos

They see me breakin’
May 2, 2020
creatorswave.com
Like you said, we wouldn't be able to communicate with people on the other side of the world if it wasn't for technology but technology is addictive and once you start overusing (I'm guilty of this myself), you start ignoring those around you. In my opinion, there has to be a balance. Personally I know when to put my phone down. It takes a great deal of self control but it's for the greater good.
Absolutely agree that a balance is required. I see in my personal life people that struggle to find that balance even when they “do” they are on their phone - particularly when they take children to the park etc. What are your thoughts on this


This has been a battle in my own life, as I'm sure many can relate, and I think the more useful examination to make is how technology has affected the quality of your life. Being connected to technology has been a net positive for humanity for the sheer amount of knowledge that is now available to us all now, even if the drawbacks are we haven't figured out how to always use it in the best way.

And that's where personal accountability comes in—how connected do you want to be and are you still on track towards becoming the person you want to be or are you giving a large portion of your energy to controlling something that has slowly taken control over you?

I faced this personally and the answer for me was to get rid of my smartphone in 2018 and use a "dump" flip phone and I believe this was one of the best decisions I ever made for myself. It took a long time to come to that conclusion and even longer to take action, and a big reason I think I can do it is because I work in front of the computer fulltime anyway, so I get everything I need there and feel far more focused and present in the world without a high powered device microwaving the inside of my pocket.



From my own switch I realized that if you let your brain control what you do on your smartphone then it is easy to distance yourself from others. Why call your mom when you can just browse Twitter? Does answering texts from friends seem so important when you have dozens of unread emails next to it? When does work really end if your work apps come home with you? Eliminating these possibilites has made it way simpler for me, but it's not an extreme everyone needs to go to.
That’s an excellent point, the quality of life may have improved with technology, particularly in current times with the connection to loved ones that we are unable to visit due to COVID-19.

Interesting that you have got rid of your smart phone entirely!

As I recall, this has never happened. ?
Once, I think? Back when CW was in a meltdown. i also have friends in New Zealand, if you fancy throwing a stone for me? ;)
 

Azareal

Active Member
May 24, 2020
You could say that, although the disconnect really started when urbanisation really started talking off and people moved from close-knit communities where everyone knows everyone to ones where no one knows anyone and they don't really care to either. This to a certain extent has led to a lot of the social problems we know today, and it is only getting easier to unplug yourself from your surroundings.
 

Thomasss

Espresso Dependent
Nov 6, 2019
forumer.io
Eeeeeeeehhhhhh. I wouldn't say we've become more "disconnected" when we connect with so many other people online. Like all of you, we've connected here, at some point, and discussed topics that we would never discuss in person. Disconnected, sure - but connected all at the same time.
 

Puppuccino

Whipped Cream
Apr 30, 2020
forumer.io
Eeeeeeeehhhhhh. I wouldn't say we've become more "disconnected" when we connect with so many other people online. Like all of you, we've connected here, at some point, and discussed topics that we would never discuss in person. Disconnected, sure - but connected all at the same time.
I understand where you're coming from, but I think the original point of the thread was about how people have opted to go online and 'connect' rather than doing it in person. It's like when you see people on their phones walking down the street. They're not taking in anything around them, they don't experience the outside world properly anymore.
 

Katos

They see me breakin’
May 2, 2020
creatorswave.com
I understand where you're coming from, but I think the original point of the thread was about how people have opted to go online and 'connect' rather than doing it in person. It's like when you see people on their phones walking down the street. They're not taking in anything around them, they don't experience the outside world properly anymore.
This is exactly it.
 

Azareal

Active Member
May 24, 2020
I understand where you're coming from, but I think the original point of the thread was about how people have opted to go online and 'connect' rather than doing it in person. It's like when you see people on their phones walking down the street. They're not taking in anything around them, they don't experience the outside world properly anymore.
What do you think will happen when we have VR? Will everyone meet up via the simulation?
 

Puppuccino

Whipped Cream
Apr 30, 2020
forumer.io
What do you think will happen when we have VR? Will everyone meet up via the simulation?
I hope not! In all seriousness though, I don't think VR poses much more of a risk to the unsociable society we have now really.

It's been around long enough and proven that it's not really providing much more harm than we already have though social media.
 

Azareal

Active Member
May 24, 2020
It's been around long enough
Well, VR is a bit of a gimmick right now, it isn't really realistic enough or common enough and there is still a problem with headaches / vertigo. It should get better as the technology progresses.